Fishing knots

fishing-knots
Welcome to our guide to tying fishing knots.
In this section we provide illustrated, step by step guides to tying important fishing knots that every angler should master.

We include knots for tying your line to the spool of your reel, a knot for connecting two pieces of line and other important knots.

How to tie the Arbor knot.

This simple knot is ideal for tying your fishing line to the spool of your reel. It is not the strongest of knots and should not be relied upon for potentially playing a fish if you happen to run out of line. It is simply to stop your line running all the way off your reel, for example during a mis-cast.

This knot is actually made up of two basic overhand knots.

tie-arbor-knot-1
The second knot (labeled B) is used to lock up against the first knot (labeled A).

First, place the line around the centre of the spool leaving around 8 inches of excess line for the knots.

Next, tie the first overhand knot (labeled A) trapping the main line in the loop of the knot, wet the knot and tighten. Then tie the second knot (labeled B), wet it and tighten.


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Finally, pull the main line tight until the knots sit snug against the spool. Ensure the line is nice and straight on the spool and then trim the excess line with suitable scissors.

How to tie the Pitzen knot.

The Pitzen knot is a very reliable knot which can be quickly mastered and does not weaken the line as much as some knots. Over the years it has been called by various names, including the 16-20 knot, the Eugene Bend and by some anglers it is known as the 'Fisherman's Knot'. It is ideal for swivels and all types of end-tackle, including hooks, flys and lures.

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To tie the Pitzen knot first thread the line through the eye and loop it back around on itself as shown in fig 2.1.

Next, begin to wind the line around itself while securing the loop that is created by the first wind as the line will pass through this at the end.


tie-pitzen-knot-2
After 4 winds bring the line over the top and slide it through the loop of the first wind you created (fig 2.2).

Wet the line and pull the main line firmly until the knot sits nice and tight against the eye. Finally trim the excess line close to the knot using a suitable tool.
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How to tie the Davy knot.

The Davy knot was created by Welshman Davy Wotton and is arguably one of the best knots for tying a fly to your leader. Its beauty is in its simplicity and can be mastered very quickly.

tie-davy-knot-1
The Davy knot is one of the simplest knots to tie. First, pass the line through the eye of the fly from the back and bring it back around to form a loop as seen in fig 3.1.

Passing the line through the back of the fly as opposed to the front will aid in presenting the fly nicely in the water.


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Now pass the line over the top of the main line and through the loop that was created in the last step (fig 3.2).

Next, wrap the line around the bottom of the loop and then pass it through the loop (fig 3.3).

Finally, wet the line and pull the main line tight until the knots closes up nice and neat against the eye.


tie-davy-knot-3
Now pass the line over the top of the main line and through the loop that was created in the last step (fig 3.2).

Next, wrap the line around the bottom of the loop and then pass it through the loop (fig 3.3).

Then, pull the end of the line to begin to close the knot but do not tighten it completely.


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Now, wet the knot and pull the main line tight until the knot closes up nice and neat against the eye.

Trim the excess off close to the knot with a suitable tool.
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How to tie the Blood knot.

The Blood knot is slightly tricky and may take a bit of practise to master. It is a great knot for joining two pieces of monofilament line together, the two must be fairly similar breaking strain.

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To tie the Blood knot first line up the two lines with an overlap of about 6 inches.

In fig 4.1 you will notice we have labeled the lines A and B.

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Wrap line A over and then under line B, repeat this 4 more times creating 5 winds in total.

Now feed line A back on tiself and push it through the gap between line A and line B (see fig 4.2 for clarification)


tie-blood-knot-3
Next, take the end of line B and wrap it over and then under line A, repeat 4 times creating 5 winds.

Then feed it back and push it through the gap inbetween the two lines (see fig 4.3).


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To complete the blood knot pull the two lines in opposite directions to close up the knot, wet the lines before you tighten it completely. Finally, trim the lines to remove any excess leaving a nice neat knot (fig 4.4).

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